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Do you already go to the gym with your pre-planned workouts in your head or written down on your phone? Are you great with your diet? Do you already have a base knowledge about nutrition and have correct form when doing exercise?  You are almost there. You just need to get certified. Even if you’re none of the above and just want to educate yourself in fitness in general, that’s awesome too! No one should say no to learning something new! Enough talking from me, here are 5 awesome reasons to start a career in fitness.

You are passionate about fitness and you absolutely love to work out!

You’re probably already at the gym 4+ times a week and plan out your workouts in advance. This is what makes you feel good. With exercise goals in mind and unstoppable motivation, you are already inspiring to those around you. Imagine doing the above AND getting paid for it. Make your passion your career so it never feels like work. An even bigger plus is that you also get to spend the majority of your time at the gym so you can go and do some reps after you finish with clients. Great right?!

The fitness industry is one of the fastest growing industries currently out there.

There is no doubt that the industry is growing. Everybody wants to be fit and healthy and who better to help them do that than with a qualified personal trainer? Fitness Australia reported (on page 44) on their Fitness Industry Workforce Report predicted that demand will surpass supply in 2020. People are now changing their lifestyles and are more concerned about their health. As the generations get older, fitness will be one of the first things on their mind. 

You are your own business 

With being your own business, you can choose to work with high flexibility whenever and wherever you like. You are free to do other things when you don’t have clients such as making time for family and friends, run errands or planning your next sessions.

Make a difference in people’s lives

One of the best things about the fitness industry is that you can make a positive difference in people's lives. The evidence is physical so you and your client are able to visibly see the difference and that makes a big impact on both you and especially the client. Being in the fitness industry is very rewarding. You are helping someone enhance their health and educating them about correct nutrition and correct exercise guidance.

The opportunity to work with people from all walks of life

The good thing about having different clients is that you get to meet all sorts of different and interesting people. One day you might have a client who is a doctor and on another day, someone who works in the food industry. This is great to give your social skills some working out as well! If you’re friendly and a great trainer, your clients will start talking to their friends and their friends will tell their friends to go to you if they need a personal trainer.

Start a career in fitness today! Find out more here.

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Posted by Australian College on
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Given the universal interest in weight loss and fat loss you would think this question has a simple answer.

Of a survey completed on 150 doctors, dieticians and personal trainers the widespread answer in over 50% of the respondents was that fat is converted to heat and energy as it is broken down. Others suggested that fat was excreted in faeces or taken up by the muscle.
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The benefits of physical activity have been extensively reported in preventing chronic diseases. Physical activity is also an important intervention in weight loss or weight maintenance. Popular weight loss TV shows highlight the importance of high intensity exercise as a main contributor to the weight loss achieved by the contestants. The truth is that exercise without some eating changes might only marginally promote long term weight loss….. but why?
Read More


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Our campus based intensives are offered as either Full Time (day time) or Part Time (evenings), please download your brochure for details on all course structures and course dates throughout the year, or see below for upcoming course dates:

Full Time
20 February, 3 April
Part Time
20 February, 19 June

Full Time
6 March
Part Time
24 April

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Your Exciting Future is waiting for you! 

Do you love being healthy and fit and encourage other people to do so too?

Are you passionate about helping others?

Do you want to make fitness your long term profession?

Are you looking for a career that will change not only those around you, but also yourself?

Join the Vision Personal Training family today! 

A Career Path Like No Other

At Vision, we pride ourselves in our extensive face to face and online training and development. Whether you want to become the best trainer you can be, mentor other trainers or even manage or won a studio, Vision caters for you. Even if you are not qualified, we can help you with that too. 

This includes:

  • Trainer Experience Program
  • 9 Week Mentor Program
  • Online ongoing trainer development
  • Weekly mentoring in your studio by your Manager/Franchise Owner
  • Sales Training
  • Studio Management Training

Checkout our careers page for more information or contact:

Nathan McCaffrey on 02 9542 8200

Vision Personal Training Caringbah


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60 Blogs available as an ebook! 

Just refer someone to our Certificate III or Certificate IV in Fitness courses. 

Dr Paul Batman has written 6o articles on a number of fitness and health topics, ranging from muscle fibre recruitment to sedentary behaviour and optimal methods of weight loss. These blogs are suitable for personal trainers to read and discuss and to hand out as information sheets to clients. If a student you refer* enrols in either a Cert III or Cert IV in Fitness and names you as their referral, we will send you an eBook of all 60 blogs. Additionally, if you remain subscribed to our newsletter, you will receive several blogs a month for your own use. Enjoy :)

*conditions apply


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....has launched! 
 

What is Creatine?

Creatine is a nitrogenous organic acid that occurs naturally in vertebrates and helps to supply energy to all cells in the body, primarily muscle. This is achieved by increasing the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Creatine is a component of skeletal muscle and is named after the Greek word for meat, kreas.

Creatine (our online learning platform), developed by AC is where you will find all your learning materials including, comprehensive readings, lectures with audio, lecture handouts, practice quizzes, assessment items, video resources and more importantly, your student forum area in which you can ask questions that will be answered by real lecturers in exercise science and real industry experts.

Creatine is designed to supplement your campus based and workplace and practical experiences, making YOU a highly qualified fitness professional.


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Posted by Australian College on

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Everyone knows that it takes at least a little bit of effort to stay focused so we’ve come up with a few tips to help keep you focused.


1. Take Frequent Breaks
This is a good tactic to help train your brain to stay focused for longer. Start with 15 minutes of focusing on the work you are trying to do and take 5-10 minute breaks. You can use a timer for this. Once you’ve realised that you can focus for 15 minutes, increase that focus time and just keep testing yourself. You’d be surprised as to how long you are able to focus. Once you’ve got this down, you won’t need a timer anymore and your focusing skills will be super!


2. Exercise
Did you know that exercise helps keep your focus? A study has shown that “performing aerobic exercise 4 hours after learning improved associate memory but exercise performed immediately after l earning had no effect on memory retention. Exercise could have potential as a memory intervention”1Even so, exercise is an integral part of staying healthy and fit.


3. Organise
Organising is such an important part of staying focused. Organisation could include writing a list of what you are going to do or timing what you are going to do in a day. This can include organising your brain. Leave everything that you’re thinking or worrying about at the time and open your brain to everything that you want to focus on. Prioritise your tasks.

 
4. Get Rid of Distractions

Yes, this includes your phone, internet, tv and anything that distracts you from what you are or wanting to focus on. It also helps if you are in a comfortable working area.


5. Food!
Make sure you have enough water and food nearby in case you get a little hungry. Most of the time, having snacks within an arm’s reach can help you stay focused. Food can lift your mood while studying which creates a positive impact with memory retention. You will also enjoy it a lot more!

  

_______ 

1. Physical Exercise Performed Four Hours after Learning Improves Memory Retention and Increases Hippocampal Pattern Similarity during Retrieval

van Dongen, Eelco V. et al.

Current Biology , Volume 26 , Issue 13 , 1722 - 1727

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Posted by Australian College on
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The benefits of physical activity have been extensively reported in preventing chronic diseases. Physical activity is also an important intervention in weight loss or weight maintenance. Popular weight loss TV shows highlight the importance of high intensity exercise as a main contributor to the weight loss achieved by the contestants. The truth is that exercise without some eating changes might only marginally promote long term weight loss….. but why?

One reason given is the possibility of an accompanying increase in appetite as a compensatory response to the energy expenditure in those that only use exercise as their preferred weight loss prescription. In studies conducted on overweight/obese men it was found that there was a decrease in appetite after moderately to vigorous exercise of 30-90 minutes. In lower intensity activities appetite appeared to remain the same irrespective of whether the men participated in brisk walking, running or cycling.

With the recent discovery of gut peptides involved in appetite regulation a different picture is now emerging. The reasoning is that ghrelin and other gut peptides could possibly regulate food intake for as long as 24 hours post exercise and might not be controlled by body fat stores. Ghrelin is released by the cells in the stomach and generally peaks during fasting increasing appetite and drops after eating and is now thought to be part of appetite control.

What happens to Ghrelin after different types of physical activity if performed at the same energy expenditure?

It appears that ghrelin can increase after running but remains the same after walking in overweight subjects. This could be explained by the greater intensity and energy expenditure in running compared to walking causing an increase in post exercise appetite. When overweight walkers are given the opportunity to eat post walking bout they are more likely to eat less but eat food higher in fat and protein in their subsequent meals.

In overweight women there is a reported increased release of Ghrelin and a lower insulin response post exercise both of which can increase appetite. In overweight men Ghrelin levels is generally much lower indicating that there is apparently a gender difference in the way that exercise affects appetite.

This would indicate that post exercise increases in Ghrelin and reduced insulin secretion in overweight women poses a real threat in weight loss programs that use high intensity based exercise without some dietary regulation. Overweight men appear to respond more effectively to higher intensity exercise weight loss programs without any dietary change when compared to overweight women.

Overweight women can match their post exercise energy intake to at least their pre exercise energy level after intense exercise. However, men appear to not match their post exercise energy intake with their exercise energy expenditure. 

The implication for this anomaly between genders is that overweight women potentially have limited success in intense exercise induced weight loss generally resulting in no change in post exercise fat oxidation. One of the key reasons why overweight women increase their post exercise energy intake is the critical relationship between energy balance and reproductive function. Energy restriction or energy deficiency can lead to changes in Ovulatory cycles and menstruation cycles.

Another explanation for the gender differences in post exercise energy intake could be the generally lower fitness levels and higher body fat levels presented by overweight women. This information might go to some length to explain why some overweight women have difficulty in reducing body fat after intense exercise.

It is now apparent that overweight men and overweight women differ in their response to weight loss programs that only stress intense exercise without some form of dietary regulation.

We have been told conclusively that high intensity exercise will increase the energy deficit leading to a reduced energy intake and possibly weight loss. Ironically in overweight women, intense exercise can increase energy intake post exercise and is almost entirely compensated for during the remainder of the exercise bout day.

In lower intensity exercise where energy expenditure is lower there is reportedly no accompanying increase in energy intake back to pre-exercise levels in either gender.

Could it be that lower intensity physical activity over the course of a 24 hour day performed by overweight women can induce a greater energy deficit without a concomitant increase in energy intake?

If this is the case lower intensity physical activity could be more effective for overweight women while high intensity exercise could be more beneficial for overweight men in weight loss.

Overweight women need a combination of exercise and an energy deficit eating plan for long term weight loss success if high intensity exercise is prescribed.

Alternatively, increased lower intensity levels of “Activities of Daily Living” over a woman’s waking hours might even be more effective for long term weight loss.

Dr Paul Batman
Australian College
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Posted by Australian College on
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Given the universal interest in weight loss and fat loss you would think this question has a simple answer.

Of a survey completed on 150 doctors, dieticians and personal trainers the widespread answer in over 50% of the respondents was that fat is converted to heat and energy as it is broken down. Others suggested that fat was excreted in faeces or taken up by the muscle.

The misconception and ignorance of this subject is alarming considering those professionals at the forefront are still unsure of what really happens to fat during weight loss.

We know that when we eat additional carbohydrate, protein and fat it is converted into triglycerides and stored in the adipocyte or fat cell. So if we want to lose weight but at the same time maintain our lean body mass we have to create a situation where we can metabolise fat stored in the adipocyte.

As fat is being metabolised a hormone called lipase is released and is responsible for the further breakdown of fat. Lipase works by breaking down triglycerides in our adipocytes into smaller molecules, and ultimately gets released as energy in the form of ATP, water and carbon dioxide.

ATP is used to fuel our movements as well as our metabolism, but what happens to water and carbon dioxide?

In a study published in the British Medical Journal the researchers have modified existing calculations to identify where fat goes in weight loss.

They reported that the triglycerides (consists of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen) must be broken down to gain access to the carbon, which can eventually be breathed out…

Thats right…the mass is converted to carbon dioxide and breathed out through our lungs!! So that’s where the fat goes!

What this tells us is that the lungs are the primary excretory organs for weight loss.

Don’t get me wrong, this doesn’t mean that simply by breathing harder or deeper will help you lose more weight. The fat must be broken down to carbon through physical activity or metabolism before it can be exhaled through the lungs.

If we want to lose 10kg of fat we would change our macronutrient contribution of our food plan and participate in more physical activity.

As a consequence of this weight loss prescription we would need to inhale 29kg of oxygen and burn approximately 94,000 Kcals, while producing 28kgs of carbon dioxide and 11kgs of water.

Its been calculated that 84% of the fat used is exhaled as carbon dioxide and 16% is excreted as fluid either in the form of sweat or urine.

Dr Ruben Meerman and Professor Andrew J Brown reported a great case study as to how carbon dioxide is formed and extracted from our body during fat metabolism.

“At rest, an average 70 kg person consuming a mixed diet of carbohydrates, protein and fat exhales about 200 ml of CO2 in 12 breaths per minute. Each of those breaths excretes 33 mg of CO2, of which 8.9 mg is carbon.

 When at rest and performing light activities that doubles the resting metabolic rate (2 METS), each for 8 hours, this person exhales 0.74 kg of CO2 so that 203 g of carbon is lost from the body.

Replacing one hour of rest with physical activity that raises the metabolic rate to seven times (7 METS) that of resting (e.g. jogging), removes an additional 39g of carbon from the body, raising the total by about 20% to 240g.”

The calculations from the researchers suggest that weight loss is all about unlocking the carbon from the fat molecule so that it can be exhaled through the lungs.

An interesting and new view to fat loss…

Dr Paul Batman
Australian College

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